Viking reenactment can include a broad range of activities - from social gatherings such as modern-day Viking festivals to the training of Viking combat. Some enthusiasts also engage in handicrafts and set up Viking markets.

At Viking festivals today, grand feasts and inclusive activities are often key elements of the experience. Cosplaying by both festival staff and visitors is encouraged.

When visiting a market, you are likely to find a lot of reenactors selling their Viking handicrafts and engaging in fascinating Viking Age activities.

You can also expect expert workshops and trading stands, where you can buy souvenirs and traditional goods.

Viking village Njardarheimr

There are a lot of places all over Scandinavia where you can experience Viking history first-hand. In Norway, hundreds of people visit and gather at Viking markets in Avaldsnes or Gudvangen.

There, they reenact Viking life, immerse themselves in the culture, and learn their crafts and traditions.

At Gudvangen, there is even a Viking king – Georg Olafr Reydarson Hansen. For some 20 years, Hansen worked on setting up the permanent Viking village Njardarheimr, which opened in 2017. The village was built at a stunning location in the Nærøyfjord.  

Viking reenactment groups in Norway

"It's authentic in style and built by traditional methods. Eighteen buildings have been erected here, and several hundred liters of tar, linseed oil, and oxblood have been used. The chieftain's hall is painted green, which was the costliest pigment one could obtain back then," Hansen told Visit Norway about the village.

He pointed out that there are about 40 Viking reenactment groups in Norway, with between 2,000 and 4,000 active participants. 

"We have 400 Vikings in Gudvangen. At the market, we have kids learning old trades and crafts. A 15-year-old boy becomes a blacksmith, and a 15-year-old girl is learning textiles. When the older generation sees this, they think it's great, and they join in," he added.

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